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nekidfrog
02-28-2013, 05:42 PM
Started on uno, ended up going to nano and now teensy's. I have become a huge fan of working with the teensy 3.0 but as much as I love working with it and c++, the arduino IDE seems to be the crutch in going forward. Lack of real support for multi tab project including building libraries at the same time as a project is frustrating. I hate having to have notepad opened for my library coding and arduino ide for the project to test new code. Looking for alternatives. Any suggestions ?

linuxgeek
02-28-2013, 05:49 PM
eclipse.

http://forum.pjrc.com/threads/1474-Anyone-using-Eclipse-for-development?p=6203&viewfull=1#post6203

PaulStoffregen
02-28-2013, 07:46 PM
I personally use File > Preferences "Use External Editor".

nekidfrog
02-28-2013, 07:53 PM
I'm not quite sure what that actually does.. besides gray out the window and make it non editable. What editor do you use to write with then?

hmm notepad++ seems interesting

PaulStoffregen
02-28-2013, 09:26 PM
It makes the code non-editable in Arduino. Then you can use whatever editor you prefer. To compile and upload, save in your editor, then click the upload button on the non-editable Arduino window. It will read the files before compiling. If you watch the grayed-out window, the code will update to whatever you've edited, right before it compiles and uploads.

That's not as nice as having a button right in your editor to save, compile and upload with just one click.... but it's pretty easy to set up. It does have the advantage of using Arduino's build process. If you're just making your own project, a slightly different build process is fine. You only need to get your project working, and sometimes a slightly different build process is even helpful. If you're writing libraries and infrastructure for others to use (what I mostly do), using Arduino's build process is best for ensuring compatibility.

nekidfrog
02-28-2013, 09:35 PM
I have to agree this makes writing my library much easier now that it's in a c++ editor with my project. It just sucks the arduino IDE can't have both open at the same time. But hey can't complain considering all they've done. Including what you have as well!

gltovar
03-02-2013, 12:29 AM
if you are going to use the external editor option in arduino ide, i'd recommend looking at http://www.sublimetext.com/ =]

BambooSam
03-03-2013, 08:49 PM
http://arduino.cc/forum/index.php?topic=109754.0

Use Atmel Studio 6 to program arduino compatible baords. Imports arduino libraries ect...

I tried this with a 1284p and ended up getting a common error that is probably fixable: "cannot find -lcor"

Avenue33
03-03-2013, 08:49 PM
As a Mac user, I've developed my own template for Xcode: see the thread embedXcode: Teensy 3.0 on Xcode (http://forum.pjrc.com/threads/169-embedXcode-Teensy-3-0-on-Xcode?highlight=embedXcode).

Cas55
06-06-2013, 10:33 AM
For those of us that use a windows PC there is a plug-in from VisualMicro that helps you using the Atmel Visual Studio (AVS) for editing & debugging arduino/teensy sketches. The advantage is that you actually compile & debug with AVS but for compatibility also can compile & upload within the Arduino IDE (as recommended by Paul).

It take some effort to get it running, but It is a welcome way for editing and debugging for people like me that can use the IDE to learn more on syntax (intellisense) and work in a universal IDE for uC's. The developer has a youtube video showing the possibilities of advanced debugging. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fFM8_RhIG0U

The plug-in helps me quite a bit to understand what is going on in sketches and why things are going wrong.

See also: http://forum.pjrc.com/threads/6599-Using-Teensy-with-Atmel-Studio

donpdonp
07-07-2013, 02:59 AM
What does it take to build a project for the Teensy3 with just the arm-none-eabi tools and a Makefile? Id like to avoid the IDE all together and also get a better understanding of the complie/link process for the teensy3. Thanks!

Derangedgamer123
07-08-2013, 03:50 PM
I would also be interested in this!

stevech
07-08-2013, 03:58 PM
If relevant to you.. I'm using Eclipse with Teensy. All the features of that freeware.

Derangedgamer123
07-08-2013, 04:58 PM
Are you programming in C at the bit register level?

stevech
07-08-2013, 05:45 PM
C++ and C.
Using the Arduino and Teensy libraries - same concept: setup(), loop() - just using Eclipse as the IDE, builder, linker, with GCC.
Also uses the PJRC downloader.
optional, I'm using FreeRTOS as ported to Teensy3 by Headroom and others. With it, "loop()" is not the main program; it is called by the RTOS when no tasks are ready to run. The "setup()" call is where you create RTOS tasks and start the RTOS scheduler which should not return. You can create/exit tasks later, as needed. But you must create at least one task.

Eclipse simply replaces the Arduino editor and IDE. Much better for other than very simple programs.

This is in Win 7, 64 bit, not Linux.
I think others are doing the same, via Linux.

Headroom
07-09-2013, 12:36 AM
The Arduino Eclipse Plugin, just like Eclipse, runs in Windows, Linux or Mac OSX environments.
As stevetech has explained it uses the Toolchains that Arduino and Teensyduino ( for Teensy3) installs into the Arduino IDE.
It is relatively simple to install and the console output during compilation explains very well what gets compiled and linked with what options.

stevech
07-09-2013, 02:14 AM
Night and day -
for a project with 3 or more source files - the "editor on steroids" in Eclipse speeds all of this up immensely.
If you've used MS Visual Studio C/C++, or similar, you'll know the difference between an "editor" and a tool.

bigpilot
10-09-2013, 12:27 PM
I use Notepad++ plus a Make file and I call 'Make' from the command prompt to (re)build. I have shortcuts in my project directory to 'HID Listen' and 'Teensy Loader' for debugging and flashing respectively.

eduardo
03-24-2014, 10:47 AM
Thank for all the practical info.
I also use Arduino IDE with external editor enabled just as Paul. Editor is Notepad++.
What I am missing is the jump to lines containing errors.
Can this be implemented in some easy way?
(I believe that in the next project I will switch to eclipse. Sounds professional.)

hexodin
03-24-2014, 11:23 AM
I'm using Sublime Text 2 + Stino: http://www.sublimetext.com/ + https://github.com/Robot-Will/Stino

stevech
03-24-2014, 03:23 PM
I'm quite happy with freeware Atmel's version of MS Visual Studio + freeware Visual Studio that supports, among others, Teensy 2, 3.
Full IDE with Intellisense, "go to where defined", and so on.
Optional not-freeware source debugger.

http://www.visualmicro.com/

This combo is a full IDE, not just an editor.

potatotron
01-03-2016, 04:39 PM
take a look at the PROGRAMINO IDE for Arduino.


According to this page http://programino.com/full-features-programino-ide-for-arduino.html it doesn't support any of the Teensys. Why would we be interested in this?

stevech
01-03-2016, 05:46 PM
Hi,

take a look at the PROGRAMINO IDE for Arduino.

It's a low DIY budget pricing and comfortable easy-to-use IDE for Arduino, Genuino or similar boards with Code-Autocomplete,
Custom Syntax Highlighting, analog Plotter, Hardware Viewer, HEX-File extraction, HTML5 Editor.

In future, there should also be a debugger and an oscilloscope, advanced search, more IoT tools and enhanced Web Editor.


30 Euros (excl. VAT) for the non-commercial version - good. the more IDEs, the better !!!

But since it's Windows-only, does is improve on the free VisualMicro+Visual Studio Combo?

PaulStoffregen
01-05-2016, 09:55 PM
Looks like it's never going to run on Mac or Linux...

MichaelMeissner
01-05-2016, 10:02 PM
Looks like it's never going to run on Mac or Linux...

Yeah, I was wondering about that. I didn't notice Linux support, but then again, I didn't look too closely.

Theremingenieur
01-06-2016, 08:10 AM
I'm very happy with Eclipse and its Arduino for Eclipse plugin for now.

Constantin
01-07-2016, 12:12 PM
I couldn't get eclipse installed on my Mac properly. May have been due to the many changes that the Arduino guts have undergone in the last two years.

For the time being, my platform of choice is visual studio with visual micro. The cost is similar to the IDE being advertised above. Plus, visual studio already offers debugging via visual gdb or the pro version of visual micro.

I see this combination (VS+VM) as the main competitor for this advertisement. Both sets of programs are Windows only and both seem to focus on giving the user a GUI experience. One has been around for years and has a proven track record of support, etc. the other one is new to the show.

In other words, that's a pretty steep hill to climb but if one solution is significantly easier to use then this might finally be the path forward to allow more folks to benefit from a fuller-featured IDE (esp debugging). Let's hope that the competition between the two will lead to more innovation.

stevech
01-07-2016, 03:29 PM
I couldn't get eclipse installed on my Mac properly. May have been due to the many changes that the Arduino guts have undergone in the last two years.

For the time being, my platform of choice is visual studio with visual micro. The cost is similar to the IDE being advertised above. Plus, visual studio already offers debugging via visual gdb or the pro version of visual micro.

I see this combination (VS+VM) as the main competitor for this advertisement. Both sets of programs are Windows only and both seem to focus on giving the user a GUI experience. One has been around for years and has a proven track record of support, etc. the other one is new to the show.

In other words, that's a pretty steep hill to climb but if one solution is significantly easier to use then this might finally be the path forward to allow more folks to benefit from a fuller-featured IDE (esp debugging). Let's hope that the competition between the two will lead to more innovation.

Cost? Visual Studio Community is free. Visual Micro is free. The "Pro" software-debugger option for Visual Micro is low cost ($23). That debugger has its place, but it's not like using hardware breakpoints. The web page is vague on the debugger being optional.

After the trial period, I got VS+VM with the debugger option. I rarely use the debugger but I wanted to support Visual Micro's developer - a very dedicated fellow with excellent work. I especially like VM's serial monitor with multiple windows for multiple boards, and the ease of arranging those windows as panels. And the automatic disconnect/reconnect of each monitor as the board downloads/reboots.