Teensy 3.2 End Of Life

So sorry to see T3.2 go, it has been, and still is, great.
But i fully understand it has to go.
 
Not such a big deal, @Paul Thanks for all the efforts on the chip, I really learned a huge amount.
I too have been hit hard by NXP not getting all sorts of MCU's that I use.
Not entirely sure what their problem is, if it is some sort of effort to kill the entire lower end line.
Either way it is a shame, because in a lot of circumstances, the lower end MCU is all you need, e.g. battery life, price, etc.
Even so, I have my own bootloader not halfkay, but, that doesn't matter.
 
Not such a big deal, @Paul Thanks for all the efforts on the chip, I really learned a huge amount.
I too have been hit hard by NXP not getting all sorts of MCU's that I use.
Not entirely sure what their problem is, if it is some sort of effort to kill the entire lower end line.
Either way it is a shame, because in a lot of circumstances, the lower end MCU is all you need, e.g. battery life, price, etc.
Even so, I have my own bootloader not halfkay, but, that doesn't matter.
I'm not going to speculate, but I'm sure profit has everything to do with its obsolescence, and I think the real loss was the LC as the 4.0 is the same price and way more powerful. On a positive note, how's the 4.1 replacement project for OC going, and will we ever see anything like the LC ever again?
 
I suspect during the chip shortage they prioritized the chips that were required by major industries like car makers and white-goods, no big mystery really.
 
I suspect during the chip shortage they prioritized the chips that were required by major industries like car makers and white-goods, no big mystery really.
I've been actively tracking the whole thing for a couple of years now.
It's pretty much exactly like the capacitor famine, which, we are actually at the tail end of.

You can blame a couple of things for the whole mess, which are very similar to the capacitor famine.
  1. Of course, the big guys like nvidia and amd got dibs on anything, which eat tons of silicon wafers, and those aren't exactly quickly produced.
  2. Then you have the fact that the node that they are on is getting more and more obsolete, so fabs tend to reduce the machines for that, and in place of those, install the newer process node machines.
  3. On top of all of that, any huge volume customers get preference, since it is a guaranteed sale.
There are a lot of other factors, but those are the main three, pretty much the same deal as the capacitor market famine.
 
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