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Thread: Teensy 3.1 with Kinetis Design Studio

  1. #1
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    Teensy 3.1 with Kinetis Design Studio

    Hello,

    I bought a teensy to play a bit with ARM microcontrollers, but would like to leave behind the Arduino IDE. I've notice that Freescale provides their Kinetis IDE for development with these microcontrollers, and I'm wondering if anyone has any experience using this and possibly by reusing the libraries used in the Arduino IDE if needed?

    There is also the SDK, which could be interesting...

    Also, without looking deep into it, how easy would it be to download a file to Teensy without the Arduino IDE?

    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
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    Yes, I tried Kinetis' IDE (Ecplipse + GCC) KED, and their GUI pinmapping tool. I had previously used extensively the same sort of tool from ST Micro for their Cortex Mx, plus their new Hardware Abstraction Layer/libraries (HAL), and CubeMX, their GUI tool. Automates generating an IDE project with all I/O libraries and init code auto-generated. KDE does too. Then the bundle auto-flows into an IDE, for ST it's your choice of IAR, Keil/ARM, or Eclipse+GCC. With KDE it's solely eclipse + GCC.

    I tried to like KDE. I found it sadly lacking in comparison to ST's tools. More over, their HAL-equivalent is a half-hearted effort. Perhaps hindered by the sale to Freescale to NXP and the inevitable underemphasis of R&D $ in that kind of event.
    But I'm looking at this from a professional developer's viewpoint, not an Arduino-ite.

    In this forum you'll find discussions of KDE, and more so discussions of alternatives to Arduino and its neophite IDE. Alternatives include Visual Micro + Visual Studio 2013 and later (both free but windows only, if you prefer tool goodness to religions); there's Visual GDB, $90 as I recall, and REALLY good; there's something for XCode on the Mac for the stalwarts, Eclipse + GCC under Linux, and a few others. Having plentiful tool $, I use IAR's compiler and IDE.

    Lately, a great Arduino-esque ARM IDE is Particle.io's superb work for a web based on line builder - sort of gen-2 of mbed's pioneering.

    So it depends on whether you want to march in the Arduino band for an avocation, or take an alternative.
    Last edited by stevech; 08-11-2015 at 07:27 PM.

  3. #3
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    stevech,

    I tried as well, didn't like it either. But did you make it up to a usable project template that we can use on the Teensy? I managed to understand the pin mapping module, but my troubles started when I had to specify clocking. I mean, I'd really like to KDE just a little bit, but I don't know how to get it going....

  4. #4
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    I think KDE will be hard to use with Teensyduino because Arduino set the precedent automatic creation of function prototoypes and no precompiled .o and no user .a.

    But with work, one can do it, as has been done with Visual Micro w/Visual Studio atop GCC. Plug and play. Free. If you're not opposed to using Windows, give it a try. visualmicro.com

  5. #5
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    No, I'm not talking about Teensyduino libraries. I'd be happy to run the Kinetis SDK libraries, but I don't know how to configure the basic processor settings in KDE Studio, especially clocking. Looking at the Teensyduino startup code, there seems to be an elaborated startup sequence, which must somehow be replicated in KDE studio.

    I'm looking for a "Hello, world" project for Teensy in KDE, something like Arduino's "Blink". Click it, run it, see it doing something. Then modify it.

    Did I just not find it?

  6. #6
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    If you are advanced enough to not use Arduino/Teensyduino libraries, and want to learn and use the ARM MCU vendors' libraries, then you'd probably be better off to use JTAG/SWD capable hardware. I can elaborate but this forum isn't the right venue.

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