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Thread: Modi - DIY MIDI Controllers

  1. #1

    Modi - DIY MIDI Controllers

    Hi All,

    Here's a project I've worked on for the past few months. Designed specifically around the Teensy's ability to function as a MID controller. Hope you like it.
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    Modi is a expandable controller bank system designed for AVR microcontroller platforms like Arduino and Teensy. There are four distinct module types available, each consisting of either 8 or 16 individually readable analog or digital controllers. Modi boards can be stacked to support up to 64 inputs making them ideal for MIDI/OSC projects.

    The system utilizes the 4051 8-channel analog multiplexer and a firmware library to collect readings from all the controllers. A smoothing method is included in the library to facilitate stable readings.

    There are four board types...
    Hybri 8 buttons + 8 potentiometers
    Turni 16 potentiometers
    Pushi 16 buttons
    Slidi 8 slide potentiometers

    GitHub Repository: https://github.com/brendan-byrne/Modi
    Assembly Instructions: http://brendanbyrne.info/Hybri-Assembly-Instructions
    Purchase Kits: http://xiwielectronics.com/collections/all


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  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
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    Göteborg
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    looks cool!

  3. #3
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
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    Buffalo Grove, IL
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    11
    I can confirm that the Modi boards are cool - and looks and works great!

    I used two Modi Hybri boards (8 potentiometers and switches each) and a Teensy 3.1 to build a 16 channel MIDI equalizer for the Roland Integra-7 sound module. This is the fourth Teensy-based solution added to my MIDI setup that includes an organ controller that seamlessly integrates the Integra with a Roland 90S organ, a custom B3 drawbar unit, and a MIDI sequencer.
    Last edited by aminnie; 11-26-2015 at 02:37 AM.

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    Japan
    Posts
    37
    Very slick! The function for reading pots looks solid. Check out https://github.com/monkeybiscuits/MIDIcontroller too. The 'MIDIpot' class there will allow you to set upper and lower limits for outgoing MIDI and set upper and lower limits for the analog input (good for calibrating other sensors) while maintaining stability in analog to MIDI conversion. There's also support for velocity sensitive inputs with aftertouch.

  5. #5
    Really cool board and the price is very reasonable which is a nice surprise.

    Also nice you share all the design files!

    ---

    One thing I always wondered with those tactile push buttons is how do people mount them?

    The only way I have figured out is:
    - have the button pressed up to the enclosure (and the enclosure thickness being thin enough) and put the button on top.
    - cut a very precise hole that is big enough for the cap to fit through but not fall through which leaves very little room for error (so basically laser cutter which eliminates a lot of materials unless you know a guy)

    - other way is to 3d print plastic that has a shaft to press down and hit the tactile switch and you fasten that to the enclosure, lot of commercial electronics do this. I have never tried this but it seems somewhat doable. Probably take some experimenting with thickness so it bends but is still strong.

    The one solution that I saw which looked very attractive is I was fixing (okay cleaning, I spilt orange juice on it) a traktor kontrol x1 where the rubber membrane buttons actuate a tactile switch (vs a pcb contact like on tv remotes) which gives you that nice click sound and makes things somewhat easier to mount - you still have to do the pcb flush but you have a bit more vertical room to fit stuff on the same pcb (like rotary encoders/pots and sliders) Problem is finding a reasonably cheap source of these in various shapes. Best I found was square ones (like on those mononomes) which while cheap per unit you had to buy like $500 of them which is ALOT.

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