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Thread: Memory Board to use big matrices of floats

  1. #1
    Junior Member
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    Memory Board to use big matrices of floats

    Hello guys! I am working on a small project which need to use some big matrices (200 by 256 floats) and I am using Teensy 3.2 and Audio Adaptor Board . This one isn't powerful enough. We need more RAM. My project consists of sound recognition based on FFT.

    I saw Frank's memoryboard with 6 chips of 23LC1024 RAM but I don't know if it will work. I have seen some projects using it to increase the audio delay. I just want to use bigger variables in my program.

    Also I have looked for a tutorial or something like that to help myself about how connect Frank's memoryboard but I found nothing with respect to.

    I have to say that I'm not an expert in this field so any help is welcome


    Thanks,

    Alejandro

  2. #2
    Senior Member+ MichaelMeissner's Avatar
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    Note, that 200*256 (*4 bytes) is 200K, which is just under the 256K SDRAM limit of the forthcoming Teensy 3.6 to hold a single matrix in read/write memory. If the matrices are read-only constants, then you might be able to store up to 7 matrices on the 3.6.

    Add-on memory boards would not be able to be used like regular memory, but instead you would have to read a block of memory in, process it, and write it back out.

    I suspect you may need to step up to something like a Raspberry Pi, which has more memory, a faster clock cycle, and hardware FP (the current 3.2 does not have hardware FP, but the 3.6 will have single precision). Of course, a Raspberry Pi is programmed differently than a Teensy, and real time stuff is more of a hassle.

  3. #3
    Senior Member+ Frank B's Avatar
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    Yes, i'd try the teensy 3.6, too.
    For the memory-board you need a lib, and it is not very well for random access, because there is some overhead to transmit the address. For sequencial accesses, it is much faster. But it still uses SPI.

  4. #4
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    Thank you very much for you answers!

    I didnt know that it was bad idea for random access memory. Also Raspberry Pi is really good but Teensy is perfect to build this one The Audio Library simplifies the project a lot.

    I bought 2 Teensy 3.6 from Kickstarter one week ago to try it. The problem is that I have to finish this project before mid October. I don't know if the shipping will arrive in time.

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