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Thread: Best way to mount Teensy LC to plywood?

  1. #1
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    Best way to mount Teensy LC to plywood?

    I want to mount a Teensy LC onto 1/8 inch thick plywood.
    It should be sturdy enough for plugging and unplugging the USB.
    Teensy LC does not have standoff holes.
    Two options are described below.

    1) Standoffs in pinholes:
    Standoffs that can be soldered into unused pin holes like a header pin.
    Then screw the standoff onto the plywood.
    I didn't find such a standoff on the Internet, so maybe not such a good idea.

    2) Dead-bug style:
    Solder header pins so the pins point up.
    And then glue the flat bottom of Teensy to plywood like a dead bug.
    After testing Teensy LC on a prototype, I want to move Teensy to the next prototype.
    So ungluing might be a problem.

    Is there a better way to mount Teensy LC to plywood?

    Thank you in advance.

  2. #2
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    you could glue in a header in the plywood, and teensy with the pins just sits in the socket

    you could even wire to the header before glueing it in, then you can just do a drop in and your set

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by tonton81 View Post
    you could glue in a header in the plywood, and teensy with the pins just sits in the socket

    you could even wire to the header before glueing it in, then you can just do a drop in and your set
    I am having a hard time picturing that.
    Do you mean a socket header like this?:
    Click image for larger version. 

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    How do you glue the wired header to the plywood?
    Gluing the headers vertically would put the wires through the plywood.
    Gluing the headers on its side would only secure one edge of Teensy, with the other edge sticking out from the plywood.

  4. #4
    Senior Member+ defragster's Avatar
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    I pictured standard female headers being used. They might be soldered to a perfboard that could be attached to the plywood and the Teensy could be socketed and removed. And the wires needed for the installation might be soldered to the PCB leaving them behind with the attached perfboard.

  5. #5
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    Name:  F4DBA200-3AE3-4F8E-89AC-532BF1117788.jpeg
Views: 61
Size:  13.1 KByou can bend the header pins sideways if you prefer lower profile, and solder to the edge of the pins
    Last edited by tonton81; 08-13-2018 at 11:11 AM.

  6. #6
    Senior Member+ MichaelMeissner's Avatar
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    You could solder your Teensy to a prototype board that has mount holes. For the Teensy LC/3.2, I prefer either of these boards:


    Both are breadboard style in that you can attach 2 extra connections per Teensy Pin (first board from Dr. Azzy) or 4 extra connections (Adafruit board).

    I've also glued hook-and-loop (such as Velcro [tm]) to the back of a Teensy and to the board. But there you need to make sure the glue of the hook-and-loop is secure. Generally though the small prototype boards with mount holes are better.

    You could always hot glue the Teensy to the board if you aren't going to use the board outside where it can get hot enough to remelt the hot-glue.

    You could drill holes in the plywood and run cords to go around the Teensy, and tie underneath. Or use hook-and-loop straps to keep the Teensy in.

    If you have thin pieces of wood, you could build little walls around the teensy, gluing them to the plywood (you would need to have something on 4 sides, so you would need just a little on the USB side. Or you could drill holes for dowel pegs.

  7. #7
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    I often use hot glue for things like this, though this tends to mean I end up buying another teensy rather than getting the old one out.

    Depending on how this is wired another option is sewing - if you have unused holes you can drill holes in the board and use fine wire (wire wrap type) or reasonably heavy thread to tie the teensy in place, with wire you can twist it down for a solid mount. Am not endorsing this for any long term project but works for short term if low profile is key (cable ties may also work if you have the right size to hand).

    Note that any solution that gets metal parts of the PCB in contact with the wood has the potential to do interesting things if the wood absorbs moisture. Unlikely to fail outright but can unbalance analog circuits and electrolise into interesting things.

  8. #8
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    Thanks for all the solutions!

    Thanks for all your solutions!
    Here are two more solutions:

    - circuit board edge mount kit:
    Click image for larger version. 

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    - mini breadboard with mount holes:
    Click image for larger version. 

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    I am going with tonton81's solution for its low profile:
    Solder two header socket with right angle pins to Teensy, then hot glue sockets laying flat on plywood.
    Degluing is easy enough if not too much hot glue is used: pry the header sockets off the plywood with a knife and then peel the remaining glue off.
    Name:  1674.jpg
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    Last edited by wolfv; 08-13-2018 at 05:37 PM. Reason: add degluing

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