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Thread: Teensy 2 ++

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    Teensy 2 ++

    Got a Teensey 2 ++ and loaded some keyboard code into it, needed to update the code and when I got it hooked back up to reload the new code, the switch will not bring it into program mode, and the menu is greted out...any ideas

  2. #2
    Senior Member PaulStoffregen's Avatar
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    Try the recovery process, where you hold the button while plugging in the cable.

    https://www.pjrc.com/teensy/troubleshoot.html

    As a last resort, especially if using Windows, reboot your computer and do this from a fresh reboot. It's rare, but sometimes very wrong USB code can crash the USB drivers.

    Also check if your Teensy is genuine. The counterfeits from ebay & aliexpress are easily bricked. If you have one of those, I'm afraid you're probably out of luck.

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    Thank you for your quick response...that did not work, pressing the button does nothing (use to bring up the teensey programmer) I am using Ubuntu to run the code in...any other ideas on has my Teensey somehow gotten hosed?

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    Senior Member PaulStoffregen's Avatar
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    Where'd you buy it? Is it a genuine Teensy or a counterfeit?

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    Genuine, bought right off this sight

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    Senior Member PaulStoffregen's Avatar
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    Try running "tail -f /var/log/syslog" in a terminal. This will let you see the Linux kernel's log messages. Every USB connect & disconnect should show something. If you get nothing, plug and unplug other USB cables to confirm you're seeing the kernel's info.

    The recovery process involves holding the button down while the plug in the cable. Then you release the button after the cable is fully mated. If you loaded "bad" code which interferes with the USB, this lets Teensy start up with only the known-good bootloader.

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    This...tail -f /var/log/syslog did nothing, however...have done a bunch of testing since last post. If I try the recovery process, where you hold the button while plugging in the cable, the computer will audibly indicate that the device was connected...i.e. the "ding-dong" microsoft uses to alert you that a device has been plugged in, however, the light does not light up and when plugged into the computer that has the teensy loader on it, it still will not allow you to program the device....I am thinking it's bricked. anyone have anything else to try before I order up another one (or two)?

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    I got another Teensy 2++ and as soon as I loaded the code, it bricked also...so question now is is there another way to reset the teensy, the normal way is not working

  9. #9
    Senior Member PaulStoffregen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Diskmikey View Post
    it bricked also...so question now is is there another way to reset the teensy, the normal way is not working
    Pressing the button, or holding the button while plugging in the cable is the right way. There isn't any other supported way.

    We can help you, but you're going to have to show us what you're really doing. Nobody can see your screen, nobody can see what steps you're actually trying, so we can't know where things are going wrong. We can't even tell which version of Ubuntu you're running.

    With Linux, the kernel syslog messages are the way to troubleshoot. Earlier you said "This...tail -f /var/log/syslog did nothing". What exactly is "did nothing"? Not even an error message? The tail command should always print the last several lines of the already present data, or an error if that file doesn't exist, so you should at least have *something* in the terminal window.

  10. #10
    Senior Member PaulStoffregen's Avatar
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    Just to give you an idea, I plugged a Teensy++ 2.0 into my Linux machine just now, holding the button until the cable was plugged in. Here are the syslog lines that appear when I release the button:

    Code:
    Nov 29 16:10:14 preston kernel: [2497138.730718] usb 4-13.2: new full-speed USB device number 41 using xhci_hcd
    Nov 29 16:10:14 preston kernel: [2497138.831409] usb 4-13.2: New USB device found, idVendor=16c0, idProduct=0478
    Nov 29 16:10:14 preston kernel: [2497138.831410] usb 4-13.2: New USB device strings: Mfr=0, Product=0, SerialNumber=0
    Nov 29 16:10:14 preston kernel: [2497138.833004] hid-generic 0003:16C0:0478.56D8: hidraw4: USB HID v1.11 Device [HID 16c0:0478] on usb-0000:00:14.0-13.2/input0

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    When I said nothing....it was nothing. I am using it on a Umbuntu install on a laptop. I am trying to set it up to pick up a keyboard, but the gentelman helping I think grabbed the wrong code when he compiled it. So if I plug it into my windows machine, I can hear the "ding-dong" but nothing else. When I plug it into the Linux box, nothing with a capital N....no connection sound no light blink ....nothing, when I hold down the button and plug it in, absolutly nothing, no error message...nothing

  12. #12
    Senior Member PaulStoffregen's Avatar
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    I can tell you the most common problem is charge-only USB cables, which have only the power wires but not data wires at all.

    But even with such a cable, the Teensy should still get power. Every brand new Teensy should blink when powered, because our final test loads the LED blink example. The LED should stop blinking when you press the button on the Teensy.

    With a good USB cable, after pressing the button on Teensy, on Linux when viewing the kernel log messages, you should see lines similar to those I showed. On Windows, you should see a HID device appear in the Windows Device Manager, with ID 16C0 / 0478. It should look like this:



    Linux can be quite difficult if you are not an expert with Unix & Linux.

    Since you're getting the "ding dong" sound on Windows, please try using the Windows Device Manager. Open the section for Human Interface Device. When you hear the sound, after pressing the button, you should see the Human Interface Device section change. Look at the properties for all the devices listed. You should find one with the 16C0 / 0478 numbers.

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    Thanks guys, I think I got it back to square one...now to get back to pounding out code

  14. #14
    Senior Member PaulStoffregen's Avatar
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    Any insight on what actually went wrong? Might help others who later find this thread...

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    I will be looking at the code my friend compiled...I believe it may be in there, but I will share as soon as I am aware of the problem

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