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Thread: New Teensy 3.5 & 3.6 User Just Saying Hi

  1. #1
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    New Teensy 3.5 & 3.6 User Just Saying Hi

    Hi All.
    After a fruitful few years with the ATmega1284P, I realized it was to time to move on. I have been intrigued with the Teensy platform for some time, and I finally purchased the Teensy 3.5 and 3.6. The two boards arrived a few days ago and I have been having a fantastic learning experience.

    Without doubt, this forum has been, and will continue to be, an invaluable tool in my education. The professional attiude on the forum is a refreshing change to some of the other forums I've visited, and it also played a role in my move to Teensy.

    I think, for now, I've bored you all enough
    Bye.

  2. #2
    Senior Member+ Frank B's Avatar
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    Yes, this forum was my reason to choose Teensy, too - after a very long absence (some years) from microcontrollers. Before that, I used ATMEL, and STM - not with Arduino.
    Arduino might be for beginners - that's true - but if you ignore the IDE, it is quite useful for more advanced, not "beginner" projects only, too.

    Welcome.

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    Hi Frank B
    My roots go a bit further into the past. I cut my micro-processor teeth on the Motorola 6800 series. Most of the production stuff was on the Motorola 68705 micro-controller. My career path took me away from micro-controllers, but I'm back, decades later, exploring the world of micro-comtrollers again.

    I started down the Arduino road, but finding that C++ was the driving force behind it all, I rubbed my hands with glee, and have been honing my embedded C++ skills since. I ran into the limitations of the 8 bit architecture and now with Teensy I can finally expand into the 32 bit ARM world.

    I fully expect to have a teensy bit of fun and challenge

  4. #4
    Senior Member+ Frank B's Avatar
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    I mentioned microcontrollers only. I learnd assembler on a ZX81 (Z80 CPU) and C64 (6510 aka 6502 CPU).
    Some time I worked on a CYBER mainframe Big machine.. needed an own room

  5. #5
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    I played with the 4004 and 4040 when they were first released, but It wasn't until the 6800 was released that
    I settled on Motorola. When the RCA6502 was first released I played with it thinking It may be useful for remote data logging, but I never got the project off the ground -- too many higher priorities.

    i now look back fondly at getting the 6800 development board when it was released and interfacing it to a teletype with paper tape for uploading assembler object code. It was quite the Eureka moment. Hard to believe that this was 40+ years ago.

  6. #6
    Senior Member PaulStoffregen's Avatar
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    With Teensy, you're still sorta on the same Motorola path.

    Only a few years ago NXP acquired Freescale, which was formerly the semiconductor division of Motorola. So far, it seems the former Freescale folks are still mostly operating independently of the NXP's other microcontroller business with lineage from Philips and Signetics.

    But pretty much everything on Teensy is done little-endian. Intel won the world's hearts & minds on byte order! Still, sometimes with NXP's stuff that's probably inherited older code from those Motorola days, sometimes I run across stuff that was designed as big-endian.

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    Wow, Frank B, I also learned 6502 (Atari 400) and Z80 (ZX81) assemblers, and worked on CDC Cyber, in college! Later, at work, I developed microcontroller systems with Z80, Intel 8048, 8041, 8051, and Motorola DSP56000. Great fun! I love the Teeny 3 series for its ease, size, power, and 5-volt compatibility (to talk to those old computers).

  8. #8
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    Citabria, in the few weeks I've been experimenting with the Teensy 3 series, I too have found them to be powerful tools. So far, I've been most impressed with the flexibility of the interrrupts and timers. Moving to Teensy has proven to be very worthwhile.

  9. #9
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    Kind of piggybacking on a new member here. Been lurking in the background for several months absorbing all the great knowledge available on this forum and Paul's website. Cut my teeth on the very old RCA 1802 and quickly graduated up to 6502 (Atari 800), spent a lot of time on 8052 and eventually migrated onto Parallax's Propeller. Got into Arduino just to see what all the hoopla was about which landed me on the Teensy 3.5 - I like that it runs on 3.3V but is 5 Volt tolerant. A lot of my addons are 5 Volt so I don't have to concern myself (too much!) about level conversions.

  10. #10
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    Ah yes, the CDP1802 COSMAC. I played around with it when it was first released, because the idea of being able to drop the clock frequency to 0 intrigued me. Never did anything useful with it, because of the effort and resources being put into the Motorola 6800 series.

  11. #11
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    I too started out on Arduinos (using them for data loggers mainly) but after spending dozens of hours trying to get code to fit into 32K, i abandoned them and move to Teensy. My largest project has some 8 sensors, 320x240 display, SD, cards, an around 3000 lines of code and i'm not even halfway in running out of memory--I'll never go back--not even to ESP's...

    Agree this forum is the best, very helpful people with very caring disposition--don't get me going on some of the attitude problems on the Arduino forum Paul is the best.

    My only issue is that I can't pay much back to this forum (other that a YouTube vid here and there). I get ton's of help, but I offer little assistance as I'm a BSME/MBA in the electronics world and way out of my domain.

    Welcome! Post some updates as to what you are working on.

  12. #12
    Junior Member blittled's Avatar
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    Looks like I'm in good company. I learned 6502 assembly at Penn State since they thought the 6502 was the future at the time . I then learned Z80 on the ZX81 and returned to 6502 on the Commodore 64. In the 90's for a job assignment I was introduced to the Microchip microcontrollers and have been dabbling in microcontrollers since then. I'm into bare metal Arm development and I find the Teensy and Arduino Due are the best platforms for that development.

    I also like the professionalism and comradeship of this forum.

    Welcome quadrupel

  13. #13
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    My first experiences with programming were about learning assembler. C and (cough, cough) COBOL were on my plate a few years later. My interest with the ATmega328P and ATmega1284P cantered around maximizing their performance, which did involve a lot of "bare metal" AVR programming. Now, that I've moved onto the ARM platform and Teensy, I'm looking forward to "bare metal" programming with it as well, but damn that 2237 page Reference Manual is a time killer! My first few weeks with the Teensy 3.5/3.6 have been very productive. I've had a few
    "facepalm" newbie experiences, but it's been a fun.

    Thanks everyone for the warm welcome.

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