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Thread: Teensy 3.6 to Arduino MEGA Adapter Board

  1. #1
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    Teensy 3.6 to Arduino MEGA Adapter Board

    Hi everyone,
    right now Im using a quite large shield for my project with a Arduino Mega. On this shield are multiple other smaller shields connected, that are all basically produced to work with the 5V of the Mega.
    I know that the Teensy 3.5 is capable of 5V. Im not sure if the 3.6 is, but from what I read it is not.

    Any way I would like to upgrade, but kind of use my shield. Ofc the code might be changed.

    So of cause I could look out or kind of work through the pain of producing a adapter shield for the 3.5 and not worry so much about the 3V-5V thing, but maybe it would be needed to get a little bit more computing power than the 3.5 has.

    Therefore my question :
    Is there a adapter board/shield for the 3.6 "to" Arduino Mega ?
    If not is it something quite difficult. I have no clue since I havent dive into it.

    Regards and thank you !

  2. #2
    Senior Member+ Theremingenieur's Avatar
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    It is difficult:
    1.) Probably, the shield(s) will send 5V instead of the allowed 3.3V to the Teensy which will kill a T3.6 while the T3.5 will survive.
    2.) The shields will probably also expect 5V signals (on GPIO, I2C, SPI, analog, whatever) but they'll only get 3.3V from either Teensy 3.5 or 3.6 which could prevent them from functioning correctly.

  3. #3
    Senior Member+ MichaelMeissner's Avatar
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    Note, the Teensy 3.5 will always send 3.3v as output. This means that if the shield is expecting a 5v signal, it will only get 3.3v and may not work. On the digital pins, the Teensy 3.5 will accept up to 5v input. The analog only pins must not get more than 3.3v.

    If your shield is listed as being Arduino Due compatible, it likely was designed to work with both 3.3v and 5v systems. The Arduino Due used a 3.3v Arm processor inside, while the Mega used a 5v AVR.

    If you wanted a Teensy 3.5/3.6 to an Arduino Due shield (i.e. assume 3.3v input/output) there is this product:

  4. #4
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    Ok got that, but shouldn't it be possible to basically convert all of the pins with logic level shifter ?

    I'm not quite sure if that works with analog signals.

    I think I explained it unclearly. So basically I would like to have a circuitry that basically translates.

  5. #5
    Senior Member+ Frank B's Avatar
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    It would be easier to help if we knew what hardware it was about.
    Most shields work with 3V, too. Or, use other shields. 5v is outdated technology from the past, anyway. Even 3V is near EOL. In a few years, more and more sub 3V devices will appear.

  6. #6
    Senior Member+ MichaelMeissner's Avatar
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    Sure you can do voltage level conversions, but it depends on which whether a pin is used for digital output, digital input, analog input, or analog output. The problem with a pre-made solution is the maker doesn't know how the pin will be used, so you need switches for each pin to say what type of pin it is. In addition, the cheaper level shifters aren't that fast and if you are trying to drive WS2812B led lights or servos/motors with precise PWM signals, the delay of the level shifter will likely not work with the device that you are using.

    Sure it can be done, but it likely is going to be expensive and large, since you will need a lot of level shifters and switches to say which way the current goes. It likely hasn't been done before.

    If your shield is 5V only, it is probably simpler to just start over, and lay things out first in a solderless breadboard, and perhaps later in perfboards that you solder.

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