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Thread: Best way to access 3.6 pins on the underside

  1. #1

    Best way to access 3.6 pins on the underside

    i want to gain easy access to the 18 or so pins on the underside of the 3.6pcb.

    I use breadboard for prototyping then Vero (I know I know) for the finished article. I could solder fine wires to the pads and to pins on the end which could either be pushed into the breadboard or a corresponding pin header on the vero.

    I wondered if the was a break out board available that I've not seen ?

  2. #2
    Senior Member+ MichaelMeissner's Avatar
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    There are 2 breakout boards that I know of.

    The first is a PCB you can have OSH park fabricate ($4.70 US for 3 boards with a 2-3 week delivery depending on when they fabricate the boards and mail them out). This was created by an OSH park user W7PUA:


    Note this board just provides access to the back pins (i.e. not the pins in the middle, including the USB header), but it doesn't put them in breadboard fashion. But it is the smallest size to use, and using a castlelated PCB, it is easier to solder (add the side pins and drip solder to connect the two boards).

    I should mention if you want to stack either the prop shield or audio shield on top of or underneath the 3.6, you might want to look at the shim board designed by FrankB as well ($6.63 + s/h for 4 boards):


    The other is loglow's boards available from Tindie (he is known as Talldog over on tindie):


    If you are solder-challenged, loglow also offers a pre-soldered version of the 3.5 or 3.6.
    Last edited by MichaelMeissner; 09-25-2019 at 05:26 PM.

  3. #3
    thank you for the reply, pros and cons with each.

    The oshpark board is neat and cheap, but not breadboard friendly, but as i use dupont wires to interconnect modules it could work ok. I don't know if it will work with a 3.6 with the pins already installed ? Do i need to remove the black pin base, and put the booard in its place - seems like that would be doable and work ok.

    the tindie board is good but as a good requires smt soldering skills which i don't have, and fully assembled it's getting quite expensive when shipped to the uk

    many thanks

  4. #4
    Senior Member+ MichaelMeissner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FFMan View Post
    thank you for the reply, pros and cons with each.

    The oshpark board is neat and cheap, but not breadboard friendly, but as i use dupont wires to interconnect modules it could work ok. I don't know if it will work with a 3.6 with the pins already installed ? Do i need to remove the black pin base, and put the booard in its place - seems like that would be doable and work ok.
    In theory it should word as the black base is just plastic to put the Teensy up higher. With pliers you should be able to remove it.

    I haven't yet attached the 3.6 version of the board. With the 3.2 version, I would start with a teensy without pins, and use a male header that is 16 columns long (i.e. 2 longer than the Teensy's 14 pins). I would use male pins (maybe the longer ones, I forget) and solder them to the Teensy on the top. I flip it over, and solder the board underneath. Then I cut down 2 8 pin female headers to 7 pins, and solder them in the two rows behind the Teensy. You can then use dupont wires to plug into the back pins, just like you would with a breadboard.


    Quote Originally Posted by FFMan View Post
    the tindie board is good but as a good requires smt soldering skills which i don't have, and fully assembled it's getting quite expensive when shipped to the uk

    many thanks
    Yep, I'm in the same boat. I ordered one of the boards, but so far I haven't used it.

    Until recently there wasn't a castlelatted version for the Teensy 4, and I've soldered wires to bring them out (eventually to solder them to the 20 pin stacking header I have on the Teensy), and I've had to redo the solder connection 3 times as the solder connection broke. I had a little too long solder bridge, and it prevented the Teensy from starting. In removing the solder bridge, I removed the pad, so one of the pads is no longer usable. Fortunately it is for a pin that I don't need.

  5. #5
    > I've soldered wires to bring them out (eventually to solder them to the 20 pin stacking header I have on the Teensy),

    i considered this, but whilst it would work it's not very robust as you discovered and pain to do each time i need to. i think i'll order some osh boards and give that a go.

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