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Thread: Im a new guy that wants to buy a Teensy for THIS reason!

  1. #1
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    Im a new guy that wants to buy a Teensy for THIS reason!

    Hello dear reader or forums guys!
    So lets start from the begging! Two days i ago i found out about a guy that is making rockets and stuff! And i was so interested in this project/hobby cause i LOVE Rockets SpaceX ... Nasa... Space physics you get the idea!
    I've been searching the past 2 days on how to make my own one on how to start from scratch! The only problem i find is that i don't know what Teensy to buy and what other accessories should i buy for a rocket to properly work!(Stabilize it make it work and other...) Of course i need a teensy! But what else do i need? and how can i combine all of the accessories I will be needed the pins and stuff!

    I cant understand! So any help would be appreciated A LOT! (I will ofc learn C++) !

    Thanks for any possible answers!

  2. #2
    Senior Member+ defragster's Avatar
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    came across this link below the other day and posted on this thread : Possible-comparison-of-Teensy-s-and-Apollo-Moon-Landing-Computer

    The T_LC has about the same CPU [ M0 .vs. M0+ in T_LC ] and resources [ T_LC has 8KB RAM and 60 KB FLASH ] as the USB Charger ... and it got some guys to the moon Another 3 similar computers landed them and let them hang out and get back.

    I suppose power won't be a problem for short duration flight? So any of them would run a couple of hours on a few hundred mA brought to the right voltage - depending on what auxilliary devices are onboard? GPS, or 3/6/9DOF hardware, ...

    Assuming the size diff of 1.4" or 2.4" by 0.7" will have room? So anything T_LC or better might work between $13 and $30 depending on the I/O needed and what they are expected to interface to for monitoring and controlling.

    Learing C/C++ is good useful fun, and Teensy had a good build environment - IDE or extended - and good libraries for lots of devices.

    Assuming this won't just be a cardboard tube with solid motor ... what else will it be doing? Active control - data monitoring?


    Apollo-11-Computer-vs-USB-C-chargers.html

    Apollo 11 Guidance Computer (AGC) vs USB-C Chargers
    I think it is healthy to compare historical and modern computing. Let's see how the CPUs contained in recent USB-C wall chargers compare to the power of the Apollo 11 Guidance Computer (AGC). The Apollo 11 spacecraft carried 3 humans to the moon and back in 1969.

    The Anker PowerPort Atom PD 2 USB-C Wall Charger CPU is 563 times faster than the Apollo 11 Guidance Computer.

    563 = (12 Cortex-M0 instructions per 1 Apollo 11 Guidance Computer instruction) * (48 MHz Cortex-M0) / (1.024 MHz Apollo 11 Guidance Computer).
    After skimming though the Apollo 11 Guidance Computer instruction set, the only important missing Cortex-M0 instruction seems to be division. But each division on the Apollo 11 Guidance Computer takes 72 cycles * (1/1.024MHz) = 70.3 uS. In 70.3uS the CYPD4225 can execute 70.3uS * 48 MHz = 3374 arithmetic instructions. Branches are not too expensive (3 cycles). Hopefully that is enough to implement software division.

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    Quote Originally Posted by defragster View Post
    came across this link below the other day and posted on this thread : Possible-comparison-of-Teensy-s-and-Apollo-Moon-Landing-Computer

    The T_LC has about the same CPU [ M0 .vs. M0+ in T_LC ] and resources [ T_LC has 8KB RAM and 60 KB FLASH ] as the USB Charger ... and it got some guys to the moon Another 3 similar computers landed them and let them hang out and get back.

    I suppose power won't be a problem for short duration flight? So any of them would run a couple of hours on a few hundred mA brought to the right voltage - depending on what auxilliary devices are onboard? GPS, or 3/6/9DOF hardware, ...

    Assuming the size diff of 1.4" or 2.4" by 0.7" will have room? So anything T_LC or better might work between $13 and $30 depending on the I/O needed and what they are expected to interface to for monitoring and controlling.

    Learing C/C++ is good useful fun, and Teensy had a good build environment - IDE or extended - and good libraries for lots of devices.

    Assuming this won't just be a cardboard tube with solid motor ... what else will it be doing? Active control - data monitoring?

    Thanks for your help!
    As i said its my first time hearing about small computers like teensy! ... T_LC is on my list buying it!
    For a basic rocket i will need the teensy to stabilize it!Something (a monot maybe) will be needed to constantly move the engine so the rockets is stabilized!
    I would like to have a temperature, altitude, and maybe a GPS or Bluetooth!(Maybe all this things sound advanced BUT i want to buy the parts so when i will be ready to use them i will already have them)!

  4. #4
    Senior Member+ defragster's Avatar
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    T_LC is way more than most Arduinos - and thinking about failure to retrieve would have less to lose - which made me think having a buzzer to BEEP for locating if retrieval area offers any chance of it getting hidden.

    T_3.2 or similar priced T_4 will offer a huge jump in compute power and speed and memory and flash resources. But NASA engineers were dedicated to do more with less.

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    Quote Originally Posted by defragster View Post
    T_LC is way more than most Arduinos - and thinking about failure to retrieve would have less to lose - which made me think having a buzzer to BEEP for locating if retrieval area offers any chance of it getting hidden.

    T_3.2 or similar priced T_4 will offer a huge jump in compute power and speed and memory and flash resources. But NASA engineers were dedicated to do more with less.
    Okay so considering what you have told me! I will buy a T_4 and spend some time learning about it ! Thanks a lot !

  6. #6
    Senior Member PaulStoffregen's Avatar
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    Good choice.

    Teensy LC can do quite a lot if you work hard on the programming, and it's wonderful for small projects. But building more ambitious projects is much more enjoyable on Teensy 3.x and 4.0 where you're not so constrained by small memory and slow CPU performance.

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    Quote Originally Posted by PaulStoffregen View Post
    Good choice.

    Teensy LC can do quite a lot if you work hard on the programming, and it's wonderful for small projects. But building more ambitious projects is much more enjoyable on Teensy 3.x and 4.0 where you're not so constrained by small memory and slow CPU performance.
    Thanks a lot for your help!! i really appreciate it!!
    In some days i will come back and leave and update on my status ! Ofc i will need this forum for more..... (For example i cant find a board for teensy to connect the gyroscope the led together! )

    Thanks again!!

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