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Thread: 5v encoder and Teensy 4.1 board

  1. #1
    Junior Member
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    5v encoder and Teensy 4.1 board

    Hey Everyone,

    Brand new Teensy user here, just getting to read over the examples. Looking to build a basic USB switch box with switches, and rotary encoders. A few questions:

    I see the Teensy 4.1 board is 3.3v only, so does that mean that 5v rotary encoders like this one won't work? Do they make 3.3v encoders?
    https://www.amazon.com/Cylewet-Encod...1119648&sr=8-3

    Is wiring important? I see these examples but none of them have how to wire up the unit. I see in the example it says to change to whatever pins you are using, but none really show how to wire them up, so it is just whatever works, or is there something I'm missing?

    Finally, resisters. Do I need them for certain things I'm using? If so, how do I know when I need them?

  2. #2
    Senior Member
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    Those look like just switches to me, no electronics. They will run fine on 3.3V.

  3. #3
    Senior Member PaulS's Avatar
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    Agree with PhilB. Here is a user manual on this switch.
    Connect Teensy's 3V3 output to pin "+" on the rotary encoder board.

    Paul

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by PaulS View Post
    Agree with PhilB. Here is a user manual on this switch.
    Connect Teensy's 3V3 output to pin "+" on the rotary encoder board.

    Paul
    Thank you, so I assume that this will do what I want, which is to be able to dial up a comm or nav frequency?

    Not sure what the difference is between this and what would have electronics?

    Were you able to also answer my other questions?

  5. #5
    Senior Member
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    It is a digital equivalent of a "potentiometer". The encoder library will tell you which direction and how many pulses (think clicks) it was turned. You get to do the rest. By the way, if you want impressive looking, you can, for a price, get some pretty cool looking versions. This one is about $20. [edit, yes, I know it is nothing like a potentiometer electronically]
    Click image for larger version. 

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