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Thread: Teensy 4. USB host port as device port (clone).

  1. #1

    Teensy 4. USB host port as device port (clone).

    Hi,

    Is there an easy way to turn the T4's USB Host port into a clone of the main USB (Device) port?

    I need to solder an external USB connector to the T4 but now I realise that D+/D- pads on the back are for the secondary USB port, differently from other Teensy models. There are no terminals to the main USB port as far as I can see. Since I don't need the host port really, I thought a solution would be to make the second port work the same way as the primary.

    I know in advance this is probably a huge enterprise and I'm ready for a no as an answer. But it's the only workaround I can think of now since I have no space within the case for a USB cable where it currently goes.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
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    OK, you have the right expectation. It's not impossible but very unlikely unless you have a lot of time, the right tools, and don't mind doing a lot of hard work. I don't know what setup you have and how you can't just use a right-angle microUSB cable etc on the main microUSB port. Most questions are just showing the tip of an iceberg. You didn't reveal what kinds of constraints you are facing, for instance. Here is something to think about:

    https://www.amazon.com/Micro-Male-5-.../dp/B07G5ZY7MH

  3. #3
    Thanks a lot for your answer @liudr!

    I didn't know those adapters existed Very practical.

    The space where I'm trying to fit the T4 is very tight, not even the USB connector as it is now–a little bit to the outside–fits. So I was planning to remove the connector anyways and use the pads underneath... until I realised they belong to the other port.

    To be honest I already cannibalised the USB connector and I'm trying to solder wires to the remaining pins, but some tracks suffered and not sure if I'll be able to fix it :s

    I wish the T4 came with some sort of terminals to the main USB DATA, no matter how small, since the board is perfect to use with external connectors for USB and SD card or at least that's how I've been intending to use it. This is a small portable HQ sound recorder/player I'm doing, btw.

  4. #4
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    Teensy 4 back to life. Man that was tough.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
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    It is, difficult, to look at. While this turned out to be salvageable, you should do some more practice on scrap boards (broken electronics etc) before doing this again! To remove a connector, use hot air rework station with a small nozzle to deliver heat to only the connector, also heat from below if accessible and won't cause bottom parts to fall off. Use kapton tape to tape off the microUSB pads you're not soldering, then use gauge 30 wire to solder to the pad you do want to solder, then move around the tape and solder the other pin. If you're just hacking an old arduino uno, your skills and tools are enough. If you're hacking this board, you need better iron with smaller tips and thinner wire solder, such as 0.6mm (0.025") diameter or less. Too many cold solder blobs on your headers. Get a tacky flux in a syringe to redo the header pins.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
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    In case you are interested,:

    Tacky flux:
    https://www.amazon.com/Chip-Quik-SGF...dp/B099XCWXX6/

  7. #7
    Thanks a lot for the advice @liudr. I tried removing a microUSB connector today with a heatgun and it took me 2 seconds to take it out flawlessly. Wish I had done before that way with the T4, but next time

  8. #8
    Senior Member
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    I tried to remove some simple thruhole components with a soldering iron some decades ago and had very poor success. Kind of questioned whether I could learn soldering. It turned out the board was covered with conformal coating against weather. You can't remove components easily if they are under this thin transparent layer of goo (silicone I think). Good thing I had arduino forum to cheer me up on various projects and stuff so I didn't give up

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