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Thread: Teensy 3.5 versus Teensy 3.6

  1. #1

    Teensy 3.5 versus Teensy 3.6

    Cool Components in the UK have a stock of 50 off Teensy 3.5 units. My development platform runs on a Teensy 3.6, which are rarer than Hen's teeth these days. I've checked and checked the pin-outs for both boards and they look very close.

    Could I plug a Teensy 3.5 into the Teensy 3.6 slot and accept the slightly lower execution speed? Have I missed something obvious?

    The pots all run on 3.3v but I can scale the inputs. The switches are pulled high to 3.3v.

    None of my projects require serious performance. Just enough to get the boards out of storage and moved on to the customer. Obviously, keen not to toast another chip.
    Last edited by ThinkingMetal; 11-23-2022 at 08:53 PM.

  2. #2
    Senior Member+ defragster's Avatar
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    The T_3.5 is 5V tolerant but I/O are the same 3.3V responsive, so no scaling needed.

    Indeed, in general they are pin for pin the same as far as I/O. Would have to confirm each pin comparing 'card to card' as used.

    The T_3.6 will run faster for sure, but the T_3.5 isn't a slouch and does OC a bit above 120 MHz .

  3. #3
    Senior Member+ MichaelMeissner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThinkingMetal View Post
    Cool Components in the UK have a stock of 50 off Teensy 3.5 units. My development platform runs on a Teensy 3.6, which are rarer than Hen's teeth these days. I've checked and checked the pin-outs for both boards and they look very close.

    Could I plug a Teensy 3.5 into the Teensy 3.6 slot and accept the slightly lower execution speed? Have I missed something obvious?

    The pots all run on 3.3v but I can scale the inputs. The switches are pulled high to 3.3v.

    None of my projects require serious performance. Just enough to get the boards out of storage and moved on to the customer. Obviously, keen not to toast another chip.
    According to my notes, the differences include:
    • The Teensy 3.6 has USB host support (i.e. act as a USB master to allow adding removable drives, etc.) via the five inner pins next to pins 1-6. The Teensy 3.5 does not have USB host support, but instead offers you 2 more analog input only pins;
    • The Teensy 3.6 has 1M of flash space, the 3.5 has 512K;
    • The digital pins on the Teensy 3.5 are tolerant of 5 volt inputs, while the 3.6 is not 5v tolerant.
    • The Teensy 3.6 has 2 CAN ports, while the 3.5 only has 1 CAN port;
    • The Teensy 3.6 has 4 I2C busses while the Teensy 3.5 has 3 I2C busses;
    • The Teensy 3.6 has 32 DMA channels, while the 3.5 as 16 DMA channels;
    • The Teensy 3.6 has 11 pins that can do touch input, while the Teensy 3.5 has no touch pins;
    • The Teensy 3.6 has 22 pins that can do PWM, while the Teensy 3.5 has 20; (and)
    • The Teensy 3.6 pre-defines __MK66FX1M0__, while the Teensy 3.5 pre-defines __MK64FX512__.


    I have a spreadsheet that tries to give you a pin-by-pin difference between each of the Teensys:

  4. #4
    Senior Member PaulStoffregen's Avatar
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    Are you using the USB host port on Teensy 3.6? That's the main feature you don't get with Teensy 3.5. Those pins become just 2 more analog inputs on Teensy 3.5.

    Also check how much of the program memory your code is using. Click Verify in Arduino to see. Teensy 3.5 has only 512K rather than 1M in Teensy 3.6. Most programs aren't that large, but if you have a lot of code or you're storing big tables or sound clips or other data in your code, make sure it will fit in 512K.

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